Posted by: sarahmeyers | January 25, 2008

Bloggers that kill traditional PR

Last night I went to the movie reception of Bella, winner of the Toronto Film Festival, at the Bowery Hotel in New York City. Everyone was there! I was with Tony Bennet and some other actors from the film, inside the roped-off pitiful excuse of a VIP, for the duration of the ceremony. We were surrounded by photographers and reporters from People Magazine to TV and it was hard to hear anyone talk over all the commotion. The film will be out this summer and is premiering on Virgin Airlines!

I chatted with one of the share holders of Virgin for some time about blogs and links. He said while he does email online, he doesn’t read blogs or know much about them. I have met many people who don’t read blogs, but only until recently does everyone know about them. Most of the time news breaks on blogs before other media outlets and it’s a new way for people with a following to reach their audience without going through the traditional PR agency. While getting the attention of bloggers like Om Malik can make or break your business, other’s blog to improve their celebrity or political careers.

David Beckham, soccer player and husband to Spice Girl Victoria Beckham, blogs from his website so you can find out what’s going on in his life, who he’s working with and what current projects he’s involved in.


Today Hillary Clinton released a new “viral video” that reaches out to the Youth community on YouTube.

With video-blogs, blogs, micro-blogs and live-blogging the traditional press release isn’t important like it used to be. Traditional journalists are not fast enough to compete with bloggers. The world doesn’t need to take traditional steps to spread news anymore. I’m waiting for the day when the traditional press release dies and I would like to be one of the first bloggers to kill it. Since I have been working in public relations I can see how this idea would scare people in the industry because ultimatley what it would do is create a power shift to the bloggers. Many people don’t trust bloggers and argue we are too quick to publish.

I get comments on my blog from people claiming to be “real journalists” complaining on punctuation or my style. I don’t get mad at these people who are used to spending a week on a story, crossing their t’s and dotting their i’s. The distribution model has changed and they need to change with it instead of badgering my blog with their comments because that won’t do anything to change the industry. Getting a blog on WordPress or Tumblr will. Traditional media outlets like the New York Times are being forced to blog in order to keep up. Distribution and timing may be the key to a bloggers success, but harvesting a culture around your blog will get you closer to the pay-off point.

Update: See this nice blog reaction.


Responses

  1. […] Strange Attractor: Picking out patterns in the chaos wrote an interesting post today on Bloggers that kill traditional PRHere’s a quick excerpt Last night I went to the movie reception of Bella, winner of the Toronto Film Festival, at the Bowery Hotel in New York City. Everyone was there! I was with Tony Bennet and some other actors from the film, inside the roped-off pitiful excuse of a VIP, for the duration of the ceremony. We were surrounded by photographers and reporters from People Magazine to TV and it was hard to hear anyone talk over all the commotion. The film will be out this summer and is premiering on Virgin Airlines! I […]

  2. This happens with every advance in society. When digital music got popular, CD sales were basically finished. They had to adapt to the world around them, and get involved with better distribution methods. Im sure many artists and others were smart enough to make the transition (like Radiohead).
    The same is true of journalism: professional writers should have a huge advantage over regular people in regards to blogging, they have years of experience and dozens of useful contacts in every industry. There is no reason for them to be so stubborn and old fashioned.

  3. […] TheMakeupGirl wrote an interesting post today on Bloggers that kill traditional PRHere’s a quick excerpt Last night I went to the movie reception of Bella, winner of the Toronto Film Festival, at the Bowery Hotel in New York City. Everyone was there! I was with Tony Bennet and some other actors from the film, inside the roped-off pitiful excuse of a VIP, for the duration of the ceremony. We were surrounded by photographers and reporters from People Magazine to TV and it was hard to hear anyone talk over all the commotion. The film will be out this summer and is premiering on Virgin Airlines! I […]

  4. I agree. What’s worse is how they treat bloggers. I’m sick of the comments on my blog when people come down on me for not having enough experience. I usually don’t approve their comments because I think that instead of them blogging through the comments they should just start their own blogs!

  5. http://www.news.com/Newspaper-Web-sites-draw-record-viewers/2100-1025_3-6227528.html?tag=cd.top

    Looks like newspapers are going online now.

  6. […] that kill traditional PR January 25th, 2008 Matt wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptToday Hillary Clinton released a new […]

  7. its true. I was just talking to one of the editors of Fortune and he says they are doing well online.

  8. Decent post. I read a blog post from a more non traditional PR company saying they want to focus on blogs more than magazines and newspapers.

  9. Hillary Clinton just keeps pumping out viral videos on YouTube.

  10. […] bookmarks tagged pitiful Bloggers that kill traditional PR saved by 3 others     panafigo bookmarked on 01/26/08 | […]

  11. I came across your blog, while reading another blog-Techcrunch, and have become a fan. I admire your sense of trying to push the limit of what a blogger can do, like interviewing Branson, that was awesome, and so much more personable than anything you would have ever seen on a traditional media outlet, where the “view” is more scripted. Blogging has no historical definition or relevance yet…20 years from now, it will be interesting to see how it evolved and changed the world. Writers should be embracing blogging, not finding ways to condemn it, like pointing out punctuation errors! Keep up the good work Sarah, I am going to tell everyone I meet about your blog, that I think may be interested. It is really a refreshing and invigorating way to learn about the world of technology, via a new technology!

  12. Unfortunately in Italy happens the same thing. But I agree with you, the future is for blogs and tumblr, newspapers – and journalist above all – have to change their industry and their minds.

  13. Here’s a critical difference between you and most journalists…they are “serious” (i.e. no sense of humor, uncreative, risk-adverse, judgmental, priggish, and intolerant) and you are a blogger (humorous, creative, welcome risk, non-judgmental, open, and tolerant).

    Who will attract more readers now that there is a choice?

  14. […] Usa a quanto pare sono in molti a pensarla come Sarah Meyers: Traditional journalists are not fast enough to compete with bloggers. The world doesn’t need […]

  15. @poetslife, for me it isn’t about the number of viewers. Obviously my sponsors would like me to get more viewers, but if I just stayed the way I am I would be perfectly content with that.🙂

  16. u hit the nail on the head!!!

  17. Thanks for sharing the great information


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